New Year’s Day From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New Year’s Day From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
New Year’s Day is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar used in the Roman Empire since 45 BC.[1] Romans originally dedicated New Year’s Day to Janus, the god of gates, doors, and beginnings for whom the first month of the year (January) is named. Later, as a date in the Gregorian calendar of Christendom, New Year’s Day liturgically marked the Feast of the Circumcision of Christ,
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Year%27s_Day

A History of the New Year
A move from March to January
by Borgna Brunner
The celebration of the new year on January 1st is a relatively new phenomenon. The earliest recording of a new year celebration is believed to have been in Mesopotamia, c. 2000 B.C. and was celebrated around the time of the vernal equinox, in mid-March. A variety of other dates tied to the seasons were also used by various ancient cultures. The Egyptians, Phoenicians, and Persians began their new year with the fall equinox, and the Greeks celebrated it on the winter solstice.
Read more: http://www.infoplease.com/spot/newyearhistory.html#ixzz3Mk1vWCci

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